CPS Events

On Boundary Feedback Control of 1-D Hyperbolic Conservation Laws: Robustness to Measurement Noise

Speaker Name: 
Francesco Ferrante
Speaker Title: 
Professor
Speaker Organization: 
Université Grenoble Alpes, France
Start Time: 
Thursday, July 5, 2018 - 3:30pm
End Time: 
Thursday, July 5, 2018 - 5:00pm
Location: 
E2 - Room 599
Organizer: 
Prof. Ricardo Sanfelice

 

Abstract:

The tight description of many physical phenomena relies on mathematical models in which variables that depend simultaneously on space and time are related each other through differential relationships. This leads to systems modeled via partial differential equations (PDEs). Systems modeled via PDEs are omnipresent in physical sciences and this has a dramatic impact on the relevance of PDE models in engineering applications.

In this talk, we will consider a special class of hyperbolic PDEs, i.e., the class of 1-D linear hyperbolic conservation laws. The main interest in linear hyperbolic conservation laws is that such equations are ubiquitous in physical applications. Transport of electrical energy, the flow of fluids in open channels, the motion of chemicals in flow reactors; just to mention some, are typical examples of processes that can be mathematically described by 1-D linear conservation laws.

The main focus of this talk is on boundary feedback control design for 1-D linear hyperbolic conservation laws. Sufficient conditions in the form of Lyapunov-like functional inequalities are given to certify the existence of a bound on the $\mathcal{L}_2$ (spatial) norm of the state with respect to energy bounded measurement noise. Semidefinite programming techniques are adopted to devise a systematic design algorithm. The effectiveness of the approach is shown in a numerical example.  

Bio:

Francesco Ferrante is an assistant professor of Automatic Control (maître de conférences) at the University of Grenoble Alpes and member of the Grenoble Images Speech Signal and Control Laboratory.

He received in 2010 a “Laurea degree” (BSc) in Control Engineering from University “Sapienza” in Rome, Italy and in 2012 a “Laurea Magistrale” degree (MSc) cum laude in Control Engineering from University “Tor Vergata” in Rome, Italy. During 2014, he held a visiting scholar position at the Department of Computer Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz. In 2015, he received a PhD degree in control theory from “Institut supérieur de l'aéronautique et de l’espace” (SUPAERO) Toulouse, France. From November 2015 to August 2016, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Clemson University. From August 2015 to September 2016, he held a position as postdoctoral scientist at the Hybrid Systems Laboratory (HSL) at the University of California at Santa Cruz.

His research interests are in the general area of systems and control with a special focus on hybrid systems, observer design, application of convex optimization in systems and control.

CPSRC Seminar Series: Making aerial robotics safer in the face of external disturbances

Speaker Name: 
Mark W. Mueller
Speaker Title: 
Professor
Speaker Organization: 
UC Berkeley
Start Time: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 3:30pm
End Time: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 5:00pm
Location: 
E2 - Room 599
Organizer: 
Prof. Ricardo Sanfelice

Abstract:

Flying robots, such as multicopters, are increasingly becoming part of our everyday lives, with current and future applications including personal transportation, delivery services, entertainment, and aerial sensing. These systems are expected to be safe and to have a high degree of autonomy. This talk will discuss the dynamics and control of multicopters, with a focus on making these vehicles more robust to external disturbances, and component failures. Finally, we will present the application of a failsafe algorithm to a fleet of drones performing as part of a live theater performance on New York’s Broadway.

Bio:

Mark W. Mueller joined the mechanical engineering department at UC Berkeley in September 2016. He completed his PhD studies, advised by Prof. Raffaello D’Andrea, at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control at the ETH Zurich at the end of 2015. He received a bachelors degree from the University of Pretoria, and a masters from the ETH Zurich in 2011, both in Mechanical Engineering.

Watch the seminar on our YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/aOznH9NUh2Y

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CPSRC Seminar Series: Real-time Analytics and Scale-out Machine Learning with FPGA Key-Value Store

Speaker Name: 
John W. Lockwood
Speaker Title: 
CEO
Speaker Organization: 
Algo-Logic Systems, Inc.
Start Time: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 3:30pm
End Time: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 5:00pm
Location: 
E2 - Room 599
Organizer: 
Ricardo Sanfelice

 

Abstract:

Key Value Store (KVS) provides a highly scalable means to store and retrieve distributed data over a network.   In datacenters, high performance KVS allow large numbers of machines to share data by reading and writing key/value pairs over high-speed Ethernet.  Algo-Logic has implemented a scaled-up KVS using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) logic that achieved record-setting low latency, high throughput, and low power consumption.   In this talk, it will be shown how this FPGA KVS was scaled out to accelerate machine learning for self-driving cars using a Markov Decision Process (MDP).   Parallel systems were put together with the FPGA KVS to scale up machine learning and perform real-time decision making for 30 self-driving cars in a simulated highway driving environment.     

Bio:

John W. Lockwood is an expert in building FPGA-accelerated applications. He is CEO of Algo-Logic Systems, Inc. and has founded three companies in the areas of low latency networking, Internet security, and electronic commerce.  In industry, he worked at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), AT&T Bell Laboratories, IBM, and Science Applications International Corp (SAIC).  In academia, he managed the NetFPGA program at Stanford University from 2007 to 2009 and grew the Beta program 10 to 1,021 cards deployed worldwide.   As a tenured professor, he created and led the Reconfigurable Network Group within the Applied Research Laboratory at Washington University in St. Louis. He has published over 100 papers and patents on topics related to networking with FPGAs and served as served as principal investigator on dozens of federal and corporate grants. He holds BS, MS, PhD degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign and is a member of IEEE, ACM, and Tau Beta Pi.

Watch the seminar on our YouTube channel:

Part 1: https://youtu.be/YNZK8V0r0uQ

Part 2: https://youtu.be/tF8Li59qUjg

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CPSRC Seminar Series: Machine learning in oceanography: How algorithms and recent developments in underwater imaging will change the way we explore the ocean

Speaker Name: 
Dr. Kakani Katija
Speaker Title: 
Principal Engineer
Speaker Organization: 
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Start Time: 
Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 1:30pm
End Time: 
Thursday, May 3, 2018 - 3:00pm
Location: 
E2 - Room 599
Organizer: 
Prof. Ricardo Sanfelice

 

Abstract:

The midwater region of the ocean (below the ocean surface and above the seafloor) is one of the largest ecosystems on our planet, yet remains one of the least explored. This region is home to processes and marine organisms we know almost nothing about, and necessarily links what’s happening in the atmosphere to the deepest depths of the ocean. Although significant advances in underwater vehicle technologies have improved access to midwater, methods for synthesizing this data are sorely needed as persistent observation platforms are utilized in the future. Here we present new imaging technologies (DeepPIV, an instrumentation package affixed to a remotely operated vehicle that quantifies fluid motions from the surface of the ocean down to 4000 m depths) and observational platforms (Mesobot, an autonomous underwater vehicle that uses stereo cameras to track underwater targets rated to 1000 m) that will enable investigations of the ocean’s midwaters in novel ways. Recently funded efforts to mine MBARI’s 30-year, expertly curated video database to generate an “ImageNet of the ocean” will also be presented. If successful, these efforts will lead to unprecedented observations of one of the least explored regions on our planet.

Bio:

Kakani received her PhD in Bioengineering at the California Institute of Technology and specializes in biological fluid mechanics and in situ imaging methods. She is currently a Principal Engineer and Principal Investigator at MBARI, with funding provided by the Packard Foundation and the National Science Foundation. Kakani has been named a National Geographic Emerging Explorer in 2011 and a Kavli Research Fellow in the National Academy of Sciences in 2013. 

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CITRIS/CPAR Control Theory and Automation Symposium | 1st NorCal Control Workshop

Speaker Name: 
Leading System and Control Experts
Start Time: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 10:00am
End Time: 
Friday, April 27, 2018 - 5:00pm
Location: 
Baskin Engineering 2 - Room 180 (Simularium)
Organizer: 
Ricardo Sanfelice, Abhishek Halder, Ken Goldberg, Ron Berenstein

 

Symposium Theme: 

Current challenges and future directions in control and automation.

CITRIS and the Banatao Institute, People and Robots Initiative (CPAR) Control Theory and Automation Symposium will be held on Friday, April 27, 2018, 10 am - 5 pm at UC Santa Cruz. This symposium will kick off the 1st NorCal Control Workshop, an annual event providing a forum to bring together students, postdocs and faculty from various universities, as well as representatives from industry, in the Northern California region working in the broad area of systems and control to share knowledge and build new connections.

This inaugural event is organized by CITRIS and the Banatao Institute, People and Robots Initiative (CPAR), and the Cyber-Physical Systems Research Center (CPSRC) at UC Santa Cruz and focuses on a timely theme to the field of systems and control. A goal of the symposium is to spark discussions leading to answers to the following questions: What are the key challenges in the development of control and automation solutions to the complex problems of today? What are unique future opportunities and problems where control and automation would play a key role? The event features two keynote talks, a panel with systems and control experts from academia and industry on current challenges and future directions, as well as a poster and networking session.

Event Program:

(with corresponding time code in video of proceedings on the CPSRC YouTube channel)

00:00 - 00:25 -- Welcome - Prof. Ricardo Sanfelice (UC Santa Cruz)

00:25 - 05:41 -- Introduction - Dean Alexander Wolfe (UC Santa Cruz)

05:58 - 20:40 Mengqiao Yu (UC Berkeley) - Making Intersections Safer with Intersection Intelligence Control System

20:49 - 35:00 -- Nathan Bucki (UC Berkeley) - Improved Quadcopter Disturbance Rejection using Added Angular Momentum

35:02 - 47:35 -- Erik Kiser (Naval Postgraduate School) - The Impact of Missions and Technologies on Contingency Base Fuel Consumption

47:42 - 01:02:50 -- Richard Shaffer (UC Santa Cruz) - Open-Loop Optimal Path Planning for a Nonlinear Flexible Double Gimbal with Parameter Uncertainty

01:02:53 - 01:13:44 -- Sina Dehghan (UC Merced) - PID2018 Benchmark Challenge: Model Predictive Control With Conditional Integral Control Using A General Purpose Optimal Control Problem Solver - RIOTS

01:13:59 - 02:12:56 -- Industry Keynote - Speaker: P.K. Menon (Optimal Synthesis Inc.) -- Title: Dynamics and Control of Air Traffic

02:13:15 - 02:14:35 -- Post-lunch Address Prof. Ken Goldberg (UC Berkeley)

02:14:36 - 02:30:12 -- Berk Altin (UC Santa Cruz) - Predictive Control of Hybrid Dynamical Systems

02:30:14 - 02:41:45 -- Gang Chen (UC Davis) - Formal Interpretation of Cyber-Physical System Performance with Temporal Logic

02:41:57 - 02:54:30 -- Pierre-Jean Meyer (UC Berkeley) - Sampled-data Reachability Analysis using Sensitivity and Mixed-monotonicity

02:54:47 - 03:11:35 -- Mo Chen (Stanford University) - A Differential Game Approach to Real-time Robust Planning

03:12:07 - 03:25:43 -- Sylvia Herbert (UC Berkeley) - Safe Control of Autonomous Dynamic Systems for Real-time Planning

03:25:45 - 04:14:00 -- Academia Keynote - Speaker: Prof. Arthur J. Krener (Naval Postgraduate School) - Title: Computational Issues in Nonlinear Control and Estimation

04:14:35 - 05:35:00 -- Panel discussion - Theme: Emerging Trends and Future Directions in Control Theory and Automation -- Panelists: Martin Sehr (Siemens), Murat Arcak (UC Berkeley), Stefano Carpin (UC Merced), Arthur J. Krener (NPS), Sanjay Lall (Stanford), P.K. Menon (Optimal Synthesis Inc.)

Watch the symposium on our YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/2AREYKF4pAE  

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