CPS Events

CPSRC Seminar Series: Precision Measurement of Mild Brain Trauma Using an Instrumented Mouthguard

Speaker Name: 
David B. Camarillo
Speaker Title: 
Professor
Speaker Organization: 
Stanford University
Start Time: 
Thursday, October 11, 2018 - 1:30pm
End Time: 
Thursday, October 11, 2018 - 3:00pm
Location: 
E2-599
Organizer: 
Ricardo Sanfelice

 

Abstract:

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) affects 45 million people worldwide each year and can lead to neurodegenerative tauopathys such as Alzheimer’s and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. My goal is to enable early detection and prevention of mTBI.  My laboratory has pioneered instrumented mouthguard technologies that precisely measure the acceleration of the head during impact, which we use to drive finite element (FE) models of the brain and calculate injury location and severity. In this talk, I will describe the instrumented mouthguard technology development and validation, as well as initial clinical results of FE computed brain strain compared to novel highly sensitive neuroimaging data. This preliminary data suggests that blood brain barrier disruption, a potential initiator of neurodegeneration, may be very common in contact sports and is detectable in real-time with the mouthguard.  Finally, I will present data on early prototypes of an optimal shock absorber that has the potential to prevent mTBI in helmets for football and other high-risk activities.

Bio:

David B. Camarillo is Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, (by courtesy) Mechanical Engineering and Neurosurgery at Stanford University. Dr. Camarillo holds a B.S.E in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University, a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University and completed postdoctoral fellowships in Biophysics at the UCSF and Biodesign Innovation at Stanford. Dr. Camarillo worked in the surgical robotics industry at Intuitive Surgical and Hansen Medical, before launching his laboratory at Stanford in 2012. His current research focuses on precision human measurement for multiple clinical and physiological areas including the brain, heart, lungs, and reproductive system. Dr. Camarillo has been awarded the Hellman Fellowship, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program award, among other honors including multiple best paper awards in brain injury and robotic surgery. His research has been funded by the NIH, NSF, DoD, as well as corporations and private philanthropy. His lab’s research has been featured on NPR, the New York Times, The Washington Post, Science News, ESPN, and TED.com as well as other media outlets aimed at education of the public.

 

CPSRC 2018-19 Academic Year Kick-Off Event

Start Time: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 1:30pm
End Time: 
Monday, September 24, 2018 - 10:24am
Location: 
E2-599
Organizer: 
Ricardo Sanfelice

Start out the 2018-19 academic year at the Cyber-Physical Systems Research Center (CPSRC) kick-off gathering, Thursday, September 27th, from 1:30 to 3:30 pm in room E2-599. The agenda includes a summary of the center's recent accomplishments, projects and activities, as well as a snapshot of the great opportunities ahead for this year. Refreshments will be served, plus there will be plenty of time to network and discuss with your colleagues and our industry affiliates who have also been invited. The event is open to current CPSRS affiliates and any current or new students, postdocs or faculty interested in becoming affiliates or just learning more -- so invite anyone you think might be interested. We hope to see you there.

 

 

CPSRC Seminar Series: On Boundary Feedback Control of 1-D Hyperbolic Conservation Laws: Robustness to Measurement Noise

Speaker Name: 
Francesco Ferrante
Speaker Title: 
Professor
Speaker Organization: 
Université Grenoble Alpes, France
Start Time: 
Thursday, July 5, 2018 - 3:30pm
End Time: 
Thursday, July 5, 2018 - 5:00pm
Location: 
E2 - Room 599
Organizer: 
Prof. Ricardo Sanfelice

 

Abstract:

The tight description of many physical phenomena relies on mathematical models in which variables that depend simultaneously on space and time are related each other through differential relationships. This leads to systems modeled via partial differential equations (PDEs). Systems modeled via PDEs are omnipresent in physical sciences and this has a dramatic impact on the relevance of PDE models in engineering applications.

In this talk, we will consider a special class of hyperbolic PDEs, i.e., the class of 1-D linear hyperbolic conservation laws. The main interest in linear hyperbolic conservation laws is that such equations are ubiquitous in physical applications. Transport of electrical energy, the flow of fluids in open channels, the motion of chemicals in flow reactors; just to mention some, are typical examples of processes that can be mathematically described by 1-D linear conservation laws.

The main focus of this talk is on boundary feedback control design for 1-D linear hyperbolic conservation laws. Sufficient conditions in the form of Lyapunov-like functional inequalities are given to certify the existence of a bound on the $\mathcal{L}_2$ (spatial) norm of the state with respect to energy bounded measurement noise. Semidefinite programming techniques are adopted to devise a systematic design algorithm. The effectiveness of the approach is shown in a numerical example.  

Bio:

Francesco Ferrante is an assistant professor of Automatic Control (maître de conférences) at the University of Grenoble Alpes and member of the Grenoble Images Speech Signal and Control Laboratory.

He received in 2010 a “Laurea degree” (BSc) in Control Engineering from University “Sapienza” in Rome, Italy and in 2012 a “Laurea Magistrale” degree (MSc) cum laude in Control Engineering from University “Tor Vergata” in Rome, Italy. During 2014, he held a visiting scholar position at the Department of Computer Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz. In 2015, he received a PhD degree in control theory from “Institut supérieur de l'aéronautique et de l’espace” (SUPAERO) Toulouse, France. From November 2015 to August 2016, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Clemson University. From August 2015 to September 2016, he held a position as postdoctoral scientist at the Hybrid Systems Laboratory (HSL) at the University of California at Santa Cruz.

His research interests are in the general area of systems and control with a special focus on hybrid systems, observer design, application of convex optimization in systems and control.

CPSRC Seminar Series: Making aerial robotics safer in the face of external disturbances

Speaker Name: 
Mark W. Mueller
Speaker Title: 
Professor
Speaker Organization: 
UC Berkeley
Start Time: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 3:30pm
End Time: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 5:00pm
Location: 
E2 - Room 599
Organizer: 
Prof. Ricardo Sanfelice

 

Abstract:

Flying robots, such as multicopters, are increasingly becoming part of our everyday lives, with current and future applications including personal transportation, delivery services, entertainment, and aerial sensing. These systems are expected to be safe and to have a high degree of autonomy. This talk will discuss the dynamics and control of multicopters, with a focus on making these vehicles more robust to external disturbances, and component failures. Finally, we will present the application of a failsafe algorithm to a fleet of drones performing as part of a live theater performance on New York’s Broadway.

Bio:

Mark W. Mueller joined the mechanical engineering department at UC Berkeley in September 2016. He completed his PhD studies, advised by Prof. Raffaello D’Andrea, at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control at the ETH Zurich at the end of 2015. He received a bachelors degree from the University of Pretoria, and a masters from the ETH Zurich in 2011, both in Mechanical Engineering.

Watch the seminar on our YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/aOznH9NUh2Y

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CPSRC Seminar Series: Real-time Analytics and Scale-out Machine Learning with FPGA Key-Value Store

Speaker Name: 
John W. Lockwood
Speaker Title: 
CEO
Speaker Organization: 
Algo-Logic Systems, Inc.
Start Time: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 3:30pm
End Time: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 5:00pm
Location: 
E2 - Room 599
Organizer: 
Ricardo Sanfelice

 

Abstract:

Key Value Store (KVS) provides a highly scalable means to store and retrieve distributed data over a network.   In datacenters, high performance KVS allow large numbers of machines to share data by reading and writing key/value pairs over high-speed Ethernet.  Algo-Logic has implemented a scaled-up KVS using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) logic that achieved record-setting low latency, high throughput, and low power consumption.   In this talk, it will be shown how this FPGA KVS was scaled out to accelerate machine learning for self-driving cars using a Markov Decision Process (MDP).   Parallel systems were put together with the FPGA KVS to scale up machine learning and perform real-time decision making for 30 self-driving cars in a simulated highway driving environment.     

Bio:

John W. Lockwood is an expert in building FPGA-accelerated applications. He is CEO of Algo-Logic Systems, Inc. and has founded three companies in the areas of low latency networking, Internet security, and electronic commerce.  In industry, he worked at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), AT&T Bell Laboratories, IBM, and Science Applications International Corp (SAIC).  In academia, he managed the NetFPGA program at Stanford University from 2007 to 2009 and grew the Beta program 10 to 1,021 cards deployed worldwide.   As a tenured professor, he created and led the Reconfigurable Network Group within the Applied Research Laboratory at Washington University in St. Louis. He has published over 100 papers and patents on topics related to networking with FPGAs and served as served as principal investigator on dozens of federal and corporate grants. He holds BS, MS, PhD degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign and is a member of IEEE, ACM, and Tau Beta Pi.

Watch the seminar on our YouTube channel:

Part 1: https://youtu.be/YNZK8V0r0uQ

Part 2: https://youtu.be/tF8Li59qUjg

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